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949 Main St
P.O. Box 363
Waldoboro, ME 04572
Phone: 207-832-5541 / 1-855-826-HALL (4255)
Fax: 207-832-6346
Robert Anthoine

Robert Neal Anthoine

Thursday, March 24th, 1955 - Thursday, March 7th, 2019
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Obituary

Robert Neal Anthoine, 63, passed away in the comfort of his family on Thursday, March 7, 2019 in Tenants Harbor, Maine. A full obituary will be published soon.


Service Details

  • Interment

    Location
    Hall's Recieving Vault
    Waldoboro, ME 04572

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N

Nathaniel F. Queen, Jr.

Posted at 09:25am
To the Members of the Class of 1973

It is with profound sadness that I write to inform you of the death of Bob Anthoine.
Bob died surrounded by family in Maine a few days ago after being placed in hospice care. Bob died of cancer. He suffered for some time and when he was able to still communicate, was braved and accepting of his fate.

Bob, born into privilege, was always a defender of the underdog and those less fortunate. He was a volunteer working amongst the poor and destitute in New York City before homelessness became a recognized societal problem. While attending law school, he could often be found in the subways of New York, talking to and counseling people who inhabited the subway system. Later in life as a lawyer, he worked with working class people in the states of New York and most recently Connecticut.
He was a proactive lawyer; often visiting clients in their homes, people who would not seek legal advice or would not have thought to do so. Bob's personally lent itself to making people comfortable. His services were often pro bono or paid through barter. Bob was the type of lawyer who if he took your case on, remained with you until the end. He found 'no' challenging. He was the pitbull you wanted on your side in a case, never surrendering until every option had been explored.

At Lawrenceville, he was a member of the famous class band, Biscuit Davis. He was a member of The Perry Ross, Dawes, and George Houses. One of the extracurricular activities he participated in and was a the Trenton Prison Visitors group. This turned out to be a formative experience.

Bob was a great lobsterman. He would set his traps out in the Long Island Sound off the shore of Connecticut. He treated everyone the same, be it you were a Government official or penniless street person. He was truly a man of the people. People like Bob don't appear often these days, he was humble, talented, outspoken, empathetic. He will be missed. Our sincere condolences to his Mother and surviving siblings.

Nathaniel F. Queen, Jr., OSJ

To the Members of the Class of 1973

It is with profound sadness that I write to inform you of the death of Bob Anthoine.
Bob died surrounded by family in Maine a few days ago after being placed in hospice care. Bob died of cancer. He suffered for some time and when he was able to still communicate, was braved and accepting of his fate.

Bob, born into privilege, was always a defender of the underdog and those less fortunate. He was a volunteer working amongst the poor and destitute in New York City before homelessness became a recognized societal problem. While attending law school, he could often be found in the subways of New York, talking to and counseling people who inhabited the subway system. Later in life as a lawyer, he worked with working class people in the states of New York and most recently Connecticut.
He was a proactive lawyer; often visiting clients in their homes, people who would not seek legal advice or would not have thought to do so. Bob's personally lent itself to making people comfortable. His services were often pro bono or paid through barter. Bob was the type of lawyer who if he took your case on, remained with you until the end. He found 'no' challenging. He was the pitbull you wanted on your side in a case, never surrendering until every option had been explored.

At Lawrenceville, he was a member of the famous class band, Biscuit Davis. He was a member of The Perry Ross, Dawes, and George Houses. One of the extracurricular activities he participated in and was a the Trenton Prison Visitors group. This turned out to be a formative experience.

Bob was a great lobsterman. He would set his traps out in the Long Island Sound off the shore of Connecticut. He treated everyone the same, be it you were a Government official or penniless street person. He was truly a man of the people. People like Bob don't appear often these days, he was humble, talented, outspoken, empathetic. He will be missed. Our sincere condolences to his Mother and surviving siblings.

Nathaniel F. Queen, Jr., OSJ



It is with great sadness that The Lawrenceville School, Class of 1973 remembers and mourn the loss of one of its members.
To the Members of the Class of 1973

It is with profound sadness that I write to inform you of the death of Bob Anthoine.
Bob died surrounded by family in Maine a few days ago after being placed in hospice care. Bob died of cancer. He suffered for some time and when he was able to still communicate, was braved and accepting of his fate.

Bob, born into privilege, was always a defender of the underdog and those less fortunate. He was a volunteer working amongst the poor and destitute in New York City before homelessness became a recognized societal problem. While attending law school, he could often be found in the subways of New York, talking to and counseling people who inhabited the subway system. Later in life as a lawyer, he worked with working class people in the states of New York and most recently Connecticut.
He was a proactive lawyer; often visiting clients in their homes, people who would not seek legal advice or would not have thought to do so. Bob's personally lent itself to making people comfortable. His services were often pro bono or paid through barter. Bob was the type of lawyer who if he took your case on, remained with you until the end. He found 'no' challenging. He was the pitbull you wanted on your side in a case, never surrendering until every option had been explored.

At Lawrenceville, he was a member of the famous class band, Biscuit Davis. He was a member of The Perry Ross, Dawes, and George Houses. One of the extracurricular activities he participated in and was a the Trenton Prison Visitors group. This turned out to be a formative experience.

Bob was a great lobsterman. He would set his traps out in the Long Island Sound off the shore of Connecticut. He treated everyone the same, be it you were a Government official or penniless street person. He was truly a man of the people. People like Bob don't appear often these days, he was humble, talented, outspoken, empathetic. He will be missed. Our sincere condolences to his Mother and surviving siblings.

Nathaniel F. Queen, Jr., OSJ





N

Nathaniel F. Queen, Jr.

Posted at 09:25am
To the Members of the Class of 1973

It is with profound sadness that I write to inform you of the death of Bob Anthoine.
Bob died surrounded by family in Maine a few days ago after being placed in hospice care. Bob died of cancer. He suffered for some time and when he was able to still communicate, was braved and accepting of his fate.

Bob, born into privilege, was always a defender of the underdog and those less fortunate. He was a volunteer working amongst the poor and destitute in New York City before homelessness became a recognized societal problem. While attending law school, he could often be found in the subways of New York, talking to and counseling people who inhabited the subway system. Later in life as a lawyer, he worked with working class people in the states of New York and most recently Connecticut.
He was a proactive lawyer; often visiting clients in their homes, people who would not seek legal advice or would not have thought to do so. Bob's personally lent itself to making people comfortable. His services were often pro bono or paid through barter. Bob was the type of lawyer who if he took your case on, remained with you until the end. He found 'no' challenging. He was the pitbull you wanted on your side in a case, never surrendering until every option had been explored.

At Lawrenceville, he was a member of the famous class band, Biscuit Davis. He was a member of The Perry Ross, Dawes, and George Houses. One of the extracurricular activities he participated in and was a the Trenton Prison Visitors group. This turned out to be a formative experience.

Bob was a great lobsterman. He would set his traps out in the Long Island Sound off the shore of Connecticut. He treated everyone the same, be it you were a Government official or penniless street person. He was truly a man of the people. People like Bob don't appear often these days, he was humble, talented, outspoken, empathetic. He will be missed. Our sincere condolences to his Mother and surviving siblings.

Nathaniel F. Queen, Jr., OSJ

To the Members of the Class of 1973

It is with profound sadness that I write to inform you of the death of Bob Anthoine.
Bob died surrounded by family in Maine a few days ago after being placed in hospice care. Bob died of cancer. He suffered for some time and when he was able to still communicate, was braved and accepting of his fate.

Bob, born into privilege, was always a defender of the underdog and those less fortunate. He was a volunteer working amongst the poor and destitute in New York City before homelessness became a recognized societal problem. While attending law school, he could often be found in the subways of New York, talking to and counseling people who inhabited the subway system. Later in life as a lawyer, he worked with working class people in the states of New York and most recently Connecticut.
He was a proactive lawyer; often visiting clients in their homes, people who would not seek legal advice or would not have thought to do so. Bob's personally lent itself to making people comfortable. His services were often pro bono or paid through barter. Bob was the type of lawyer who if he took your case on, remained with you until the end. He found 'no' challenging. He was the pitbull you wanted on your side in a case, never surrendering until every option had been explored.

At Lawrenceville, he was a member of the famous class band, Biscuit Davis. He was a member of The Perry Ross, Dawes, and George Houses. One of the extracurricular activities he participated in and was a the Trenton Prison Visitors group. This turned out to be a formative experience.

Bob was a great lobsterman. He would set his traps out in the Long Island Sound off the shore of Connecticut. He treated everyone the same, be it you were a Government official or penniless street person. He was truly a man of the people. People like Bob don't appear often these days, he was humble, talented, outspoken, empathetic. He will be missed. Our sincere condolences to his Mother and surviving siblings.

Nathaniel F. Queen, Jr., OSJ



It is with great sadness that The Lawrenceville School, Class of 1973 remembers and mourn the loss of one of its members.
To the Members of the Class of 1973

It is with profound sadness that I write to inform you of the death of Bob Anthoine.
Bob died surrounded by family in Maine a few days ago after being placed in hospice care. Bob died of cancer. He suffered for some time and when he was able to still communicate, was braved and accepting of his fate.

Bob, born into privilege, was always a defender of the underdog and those less fortunate. He was a volunteer working amongst the poor and destitute in New York City before homelessness became a recognized societal problem. While attending law school, he could often be found in the subways of New York, talking to and counseling people who inhabited the subway system. Later in life as a lawyer, he worked with working class people in the states of New York and most recently Connecticut.
He was a proactive lawyer; often visiting clients in their homes, people who would not seek legal advice or would not have thought to do so. Bob's personally lent itself to making people comfortable. His services were often pro bono or paid through barter. Bob was the type of lawyer who if he took your case on, remained with you until the end. He found 'no' challenging. He was the pitbull you wanted on your side in a case, never surrendering until every option had been explored.

At Lawrenceville, he was a member of the famous class band, Biscuit Davis. He was a member of The Perry Ross, Dawes, and George Houses. One of the extracurricular activities he participated in and was a the Trenton Prison Visitors group. This turned out to be a formative experience.

Bob was a great lobsterman. He would set his traps out in the Long Island Sound off the shore of Connecticut. He treated everyone the same, be it you were a Government official or penniless street person. He was truly a man of the people. People like Bob don't appear often these days, he was humble, talented, outspoken, empathetic. He will be missed. Our sincere condolences to his Mother and surviving siblings.

Nathaniel F. Queen, Jr., OSJ





H

Helena Herzberg

Posted at 03:20pm
John, our daughter~ Gabriella and I are all very saddened 😭 by Bob’s unfortunate and untimely passing.
Bob was taken away from us, way too soon. We will never forget him, who shall forever be in our hearts ! ❤️
RIP Bob !
F

Fran

Posted at 02:03pm
Bob, you were a great guy, you will be missed. My condolences to Edith, Nina and Nelson, I am sorry for your loss.
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